Magnetic Waybills on the Model Railroad Club of New Jersey

Duration: 2:24

Dick Kunig is involved in operations in the Model Railroad Club. In front of him are the components of the magnetic waybill system that they use for operations at the club. The waybills in the sample are constructed of a magnetic coated material. The sample shown is the Bellefonte Control book depicting what the colors mean and how they work.

A major color shows the district that the car is going to, the minor color is the town, and the center stripe is the industry to which the car is going to be routed. Each town has a reference page that shows where the waybills indicate the car goes. Each siding and industry, as color coded by the waybills, helps new operators who are not familiar with where the location of the industry is.

Each car is equipped with a magnet to hold the waybill. The waybills are placed on the car as operators use them. The last part of the waybill system is when the waybills are removed and the empty car is routed to the standard railroad practices. When a single waybill is placed on the car it indicates the destination of that car to be delivered with a load.

The first variant is that operators will put two waybills on a car to indicate going first to some place to pick up a load, then to the other to deliver the load to the assigned industry. Another four cars show minor variations on the waybilling system. The solid black indicates an interchange to one of the foreign roads, in this case black indicates an interchange at Hoboken, green is the Trenton Northern, the one with the number on the industry indicates a specific spot where that car has to be parked, and lastly the red cross represents a bad order car situation.

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