Model Train Scenery Plaster Techniques

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Duration: 9:29

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Model train scenery plaster is a useful product to utilize if you are looking to add mountainous terrain to your layout. There are many types of model plasters and several techniques for putting them to use. In this video, modeler Jim Eudaly highlights the best products to use and demonstrates specifically how to use the products to model mountains for your railroad layout scenery.

Model Train Scenery Plaster

Flinging plaster is a quick and easy technique that you can use to develop a lot of rock work on your railroad. Jim begins with a basic shell formed from chicken wire and hydrocal plaster dipped cloth. The shell serves as the base for the rockwork which will be created through flinging plaster. Jim finds this technique to be effective because it’s impossible to duplicate the process. The motion of flinging the plaster creates a different outcome every time, thus generating the look of natural rock formations. He also notes that there is no need to do any carving after the plaster is dry, but it is very slow setting so you have plenty of time to work with the mold if you need to.

The next step to creating plaster mountains is painting the model. Jim paints one base coat and one touch up to emphasize the contours of the rocks. He uses a basic tan paint to cover the entire rock formation. Keep in mind the location you are modeling when choosing the paint color for your mountain. Jim provides some color suggestions for earth tones, but researching and examining actual rocks can help with your color decision. The color of natural rocks often vary due to sun exposure. If you are entirely unsatisfied with the way the paint job turns out, you can paint the base coat again and start over. There is plenty of room for trial and error.

Fortunately with this tutorial, there’s nothing precise about rock formations, so it serves as an advantage to be sloppy. Model Train Scenery Plaster is fairly easy to use and the flinging technique makes for excellent mountains. If your layout is in need of rocky terrain, then give this technique a try.