Layout Operations on the Boston and Maine New Hampshire Division

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Duration: 12:05

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There is a lot of variety in Paul Dolkos’s Boston and Maine, New Hampshire Division model railroad layout. Three industries in particular are emphasized: paper making, milk processing, and granite mining. Allen Keller asks what Paul finds particularly appealing about those three. For Paul, paper mills allow modelers to build a large industry that takes in lots of cars, producing a lot of traffic in a relatively small space. Granite industries produce rock on flat cars, which is unusual and interesting to look at in a model railroad layout. Milk trains are something Paul has determined that everybody loves.

Paul started this layout in 1987 and completed the basic plan in 2002. According to Allen, this is quite a feat considering the level of detail on the model railroad layout. Though Paul has continued to add some details, he is careful to not add too much to make the model railroad layout look too busy and crowded. Early on, Paul had some help on the layout from a friend on the heavy lifting, car building, and ideas. Overall, Paul did most of the work on the layout on his own.

The model railroad layout is prototype freelanced, which has worked out well for Paul. It has given him great focus, and the flexibility to alter the layout to fit his plans. This way he is able to model the style of building that fits the area without having to model a specific structure, and similarly with scenery. The backdrops on the layout are relatively low. Paul believes this better eases the transition between the vertical and horizontal planes, tricking the eye to see distance. Paul goes on to discuss how he photographs to model his layout.

For more tips and tricks for improved layout operations like simple design concepts and expert techniques to develop a detailed framework, visit the Model Railroad Academy archives.