Scenery on the Virginian and Ohio

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Duration: 5:12

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In this video Allen Keller sits down with Allen McClelland to discuss the scenery on his Virginian and Ohio model railroad. McClelland enjoys many aspects of model railroading, but the thing he enjoys most is the fellowship from other modelers. Never has McClelland been involved in an activity where the companionship and fellowship is as great. After working a job with stress and deadlines, he gets to come home and relieve himself of its stress and pressures. Modeling is relaxing for him, because it involves him with something that takes enough concentration to put everything else out of mind. Modeling makes him enthusiastic which has kept his love of modeling strong throughout the years. McClelland enjoys a good challenge to stay fresh, and modeling presents constant challenges such as updating and innovating.

Scenery can make a layout and the items in it appear larger. It can also hide track and create sight barriers so viewers have to walk around the railroad, making it seem bigger than it is. McClelland’s philosophy is that the busier you keep viewer’s eyes the longer it takes them to view a scene and it will seem larger. Bright and loud colors can detract from the layout and should be avoided along with unusual scenery. Backdrops should use muted colors and less detail because they will draw the eye to where the focus shouldn’t be. Lighting is great for creating illusions on a layout. A low light can show off lighted buildings, hide dust, and show up lighted track signals. Finally, McClelland recommends shining light on areas where you want attention drawn to.