Touring the C&O Hinton Division: Gauley & Hawk’s Nest

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Jim EuDaly’s C&O Hinton Division C&O tour starts in Hinton Yards on the middle deck of his railroad. The train start from a hidden staging yard that has a reverted loop based on a John Armstrong design. This loop alloys scheduled trains to leave and return to the same track by working around the circle and then backing into their assigned tracks.

Leaving the staging yard the train enters the first visible scene on the layout, Gauley West Virginia. The Extra 1637 East powered by one of his 2666 Alleghany enters the scene from staging representing Russell, Kentucky. Modeled after the real C&O, the Gauley station and GU cabin were not accessible by road, the only way to get there was by train or a walk from US Highway 60 on a deck trestle railroad bridge over the New River.

The railroad town of Gauley consisted of just a few railroad buildings and accessory structures, because of the size of O scale buildings, he elected to model only the railroad structures – the station and GU cabin. Both buildings are framed structures that he scratch built in 1970. The Extra rounds the big curve at the end Gauley on its way to Hawk’s Nest. This is a run through town and features a magnificent crossing on the New River.

The Extra rounds the curve and passes MA cabin at the west end of the town near the approach to New River. The town of Hawk’s Nest was originally on the bank of the river in 1930’s. When the Hawk’s Nest dam was built the town flooded and all that was left was the station. The highlight of this location was the river crossing. The bridge is built from real railroad plans out of styrene, nut bolts, washer castings, and hand embossed rivets. Watch the video to further tour the layout.