B&M New Hampshire Division: The Towns of Haverhill Junction and Barrett

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Haverhill Junction on the B&M New Hampshire Division model railroad features a diamond crossing and a vintage ball signal. This model is based on the prototypes former crossing of the main central railroad at Whitefield, New Hampshire. The ball signal, possibly the last one standing in the US, protected the crossing for many decades. The position of the ball, with one high and one low indicated clearance for the B&M. However the signal was set, approaching trains had to stop short of the crossing and set the signals if necessary at the four way stop intersection.

The ball signal is scratch built based on prototype photographs.The balls are beads, the post is styrene, and small pulleys were found. Many years ago a main central freight derailed and destroyed the signal and the shanty. Haverhill Junction is laid out as if there is an interchange track with a crossing railroad plus a loading point for wood. The track that crosses is not operational, running out of sight behind a hill. It is not connected to the interchange track and stops at the layout’s end, really it is just scenery.

Just beyond the junction is the industrial area of Barrett where several enterprises pick up stone brought in from a nearby granite quarry. The prototype town of Barrett, New Hampshire and the B&M of the 50’s consisted of just a few homes and farms. Its name, similar to the Granite Center of Barre, Vermont suits the fictional scene very well.

Anywhere possible, scenery elements are incorporated to reinforce the New England theme. At Barrett there’s a covered bridge with a rushing stream below. The stream is made up of two parts Envirotex plastic resin material. Visitors to the layout always touch it, they know it is not water, but they just can’t resist. The video goes on to cover more elements like the general store.