Making Model Train Scenery Water with Plaster

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Adding a well constructed river into your model railroad landscapes can help turn an impressive scene into a remarkable scene. Generally, when modelers build a river into their scene, they opt for the usual technique of using resin and materials like EnviroTex. However, this method isn’t necessarily always worth the time and effort it takes, depending on the type of model train scenery water you want to work into your landscape. Oftentimes, your scene doesn’t call for the transparent coat provided by resin, but would actually be better off with a flat, glossed paint finish. In this lesson, we teach you how to use basic plaster and acrylic paint to create model train scenery water such as a flowing mountain river into your landscape.

Using plaster to build model train scenery water

You don’t need an art degree or particular skills to create model train scenery water that gets the job done. To help you create a sufficient river to add a new dimension to your landscapes, modeler Tony Koester walks you through the step-by-step procedure for building model train scenery water from the ground up. All you’ll need is construction foam, plywood, Plaster of Paris, commercial sedimentary rock walls, acrylic paint and a nice glossy finish.

Getting started, Tony teaches you how to build a base for your model train scenery water with blue or pink foam that can be picked up at hardware stores. Most steps in this process can be crudely done and don’t need to be entirely precise, and that is especially true for the shape and structure of the river. Once you’ve cut out a general layout for the foam, you’ll construct three stratum for the river bed, built up like stairs to create the illusion of downhill movement.

Next, Tony shows you the best way to quickly and effectively lay down a few layers of plaster mixture that will achieve the effect of smooth, flowing model train scenery water. After the plaster has set, you’ll mix up a couple different colors to make a shade for the river that gives the illusion of water mixed with mountain sediment. And finally, Tony shows you how to use clear-drying Gloss Medium to make your finished model train scenery water look like a wet, slightly shiny river!