Scratchbuilding an Engine with John Pryke

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Duration: 6:57

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In this video, John Pryke, modeler of the New York, New Haven and Hartford will show some details of his R3 A 3 cylinder mountain. John began scratch building this locomotive engine originally in 1961 and then rebuilt it when he learned that the National Model Railroad Association’s national convention was going to be near to him in Boston in Philadelphia. John finished the locomotive engine up through a complete second rebuild and took it to the NMRA national contest where he ended up winning first prize in steam locomotive engines.

The cab windows on the locomotive engines are functional, as they slide back and forth. This is rare to see on an HO locomotive back at the 1964 national convention contest. The throttle lever also moves the front throttle behind the smokestack. Another feature is the hose connections between the locomotives and tender. These are found on most prototype steam engines but rarely on models. There are six different hoses that are connecting the two.

Looking underneath the locomotive, one can see the full brake rigging. All the brake rods for the main drivers as well as the small cylinder activate the breaks on the trailing truck, which can be viewed. The third cylinder also makes this locomotive unique. Looking at the axle while turning the wheels, one can see the drive rod from the third cylinder on the cranked axle working and moving back and forth. This gave the locomotives extra power and made these among the most powerful freight locomotives on the New Haven.

To learn more about scratch building, or for more Allen Keller Videos, visit the Model Railroad Academy archives.