Model Train Weathering with Alcohol, Ink, and Paint

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Duration: 4:16

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George Sellios is known for making countless model train weathering techniques famous. Many techniques used in his layouts have been replicated and recognized as essential procedures for realistic modeling. For example, George doesn’t claim to be the first to use authentic dirt in his layout, but he made it famous. While experimenting with his layout, he tried using N scale ballast but he wasn’t happy with the overall appearance. He also considered the idea of zip texturing but that didn’t work the way he desired either. With the help of a friend, they played with the idea of using garden soil. The soil provided the aesthetic George was looking for in his layout. He carried it on and perfected the technique. Aside from the use of garden soil, George has made numerous other model train weathering techniques famous as well. In this video, George gives a thorough demonstration on one of his other famous model train weathering techniques.

Model Train Weathering

George once purchased an O scale model that won best in show. His initial attraction to the model was due to the realistic weathered wood. The seller revealed that he achieved the look by combining ammonia and ink. George later recommended this technique in his own Fine Scale Miniature kits, but the downfall of this technique was the strong smell of ammonia. George modified the technique with the use of alcohol and it worked just as well.

One of the interesting effects George achieved in model train weathering was caused by a mistake. In this video, he demonstrates the technique on a model roof. He begins by comparing two roofs side by side to show what a difference this technique can create for your structures. George notes that you must use a solvent-based paint for it to work properly. He describes this as a hit-or-miss model trail weathering technique. He recommends you experiment with it and do it over and over because you will get varied effects with every attempt.